Birth Rate and Infectious Disease: The Imperative of Childhood Vaccination
antibiotics / Biology / Causes for Concern / Ian MacArthur / infectious / Infectious Diseases / virus

Birth Rate and Infectious Disease: The Imperative of Childhood Vaccination

By: Ian MacArthur The problem of infectious disease has essentially been solved in First World countries. While the citizens of developed nations may suffer outbreaks of influenza from year to year, epidemics of measles, polio, tuberculosis, and other infectious diseases no longer pose a major threat to these populations thanks to the development of vaccines … Continue reading

Bad Romance: Slow Lorises and the Wildlife Trade
Alexandra DeCandia / Biology

Bad Romance: Slow Lorises and the Wildlife Trade

By Alexandra DeCandia On February 17th, “little monsters” were in uproar: a poisonous primate had the audacity to bite Lady Gaga. A fuzzy prop in her latest music video, the offending slow loris nipped the star’s finger and was immediately returned to its box and carried away “in disgrace,” its role stricken from the video. … Continue reading

Rethinking Prions – From Mad Cow Culprits to Integral Memory Keepers
Biochemistry / Biology

Rethinking Prions – From Mad Cow Culprits to Integral Memory Keepers

By: Alexander Bernstein Especially following the recent mid 2000′s outbreak of Mad Cow Disease in Britain that saw nearly 200 thousand cattle and more than a hundred people infected, prions, the proteins associated with this disease, have a primarily served a boogeyman role in the media. Yet, as per a recent article published in Public Library … Continue reading

Strange Sex:  Reproduction in Taxonomy’s Frankenstein
Biology

Strange Sex: Reproduction in Taxonomy’s Frankenstein

By Alexandra DeCandia The platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) is a zoological enigma. One of three extant species in the basal order Monotremata, it exists as an amalgamation of interclass characteristics that engender “Frankenstein’s monster” in taxonomic classification. Particularly in reproductive biology, platypodes blend the structures of mammals, reptiles, and birds to make for some of the … Continue reading

Problem Solved: Successful replication of genetic material in a synthetic cell
Biology

Problem Solved: Successful replication of genetic material in a synthetic cell

By Ian MacArthur In biological sciences, researchers strive to understand life through observation. Attempts to artificially create life, however, can help further our mission to understand it. A team of scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital have overcome a major barrier in the replication of genetic material inside simple, artificial cell membranes—a feat that provides researchers … Continue reading

Nobel Prize Overview: 2013 Nobel Prize in Medicine and Physiology
Biology / Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology

Nobel Prize Overview: 2013 Nobel Prize in Medicine and Physiology

By Aditya Nair The Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology is awarded annually to the scientist or scientists that perform the most influential research contributing to science’s understanding of medicine or physiology. This year, the award went to James E. Rothman (Yale, and formerly Columbia), Randy W. Schekman (University of California at Berkeley), and Dr. … Continue reading

Staying Alive: Bizarre Anti-Predator Adaptations in the Animal Kingdom
Biology

Staying Alive: Bizarre Anti-Predator Adaptations in the Animal Kingdom

By Alexandra DeCandia You can tell by the way she uses her walk that there’s something wrong. Tail outstretched and wings akimbo, the killdeer (Charadrius vociferous) cries aloud, limping along the rocky shore as if unable to fly. She appears injured, pained, and consequently, an easy target for any predators in the vicinity. Walk, squawk, … Continue reading

Stranger than Fiction: Zombies in the Natural World
Biology

Stranger than Fiction: Zombies in the Natural World

By Aditya Nair You don’t need to be a board-certified physician to diagnose the nation with zombie fever. The Walking Dead. Left for Dead. Dead Set. Shaun of the Dead. Zombieland. Countless zombie Halloween outfits. There’s no denying it: our nation is obsessed with zombies. The concept of the possessed, brainless, half-living deformed creatures roaming the … Continue reading

Carbon Nanotube Sensors: The Rumblings of Technological Revolution
Biology

Carbon Nanotube Sensors: The Rumblings of Technological Revolution

By Ian MacArthur Revolutions in one field of science often revolutionize other scientific fields. Breakthroughs in nuclear physics in the 1940′s later allowed organic chemistry to thrive with improved chemical detection methods and gave rise to biological imaging technologies. Recent developments in nanotechnology are now set to drastically enhance our understanding of biology and medicine. … Continue reading