Fabricating Nature: The Looming Revolution of 3-D Printed Body Parts
Science / Science Fiction / Yesterday's Future Today

Fabricating Nature: The Looming Revolution of 3-D Printed Body Parts

By: Tiago Palmisano Integration of biological material with the technology of 3-D printing is beginning to redefine the limits of medical treatments and patient care, and will eventually change the ways that doctors treat patients. The last two decades have seen an explosive rise in the applications of 3-D printing–the process of making a three-dimensional … Continue reading

Eating Away at the Immune System: The Novel Role of the Gut in Multiple Sclerosis
Alexander Bernstein / Neuroscience

Eating Away at the Immune System: The Novel Role of the Gut in Multiple Sclerosis

Author: Alexander Bernstein Editor: Arianna Winchester Simply described as an autoimmune disease in which the body’s own defense mechanisms attack and degrade the protective myelin sheaths that cover axons in the nervous system, Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is estimated to effect some 250,000 to 350,000 people in the United States alone. The debilitating symptoms of the disorder … Continue reading

Arresting HIV: Glycosylation and Halting Viral Replication
disease / gene / HIV / Ian MacArthur / virus

Arresting HIV: Glycosylation and Halting Viral Replication

By: Ian MacArthur In the effort to find a definitive cure for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), researchers will first have to discover a method of arresting viral replication in host cells. The cells of two young children with a congenital defect may provide a new means of preventing the replication of HIV in otherwise healthy … Continue reading

MERS: First Confirmed Case in the US and Exciting Treatment Potentials
Alexander Bernstein / disease / epidemic / Infectious Diseases / virus

MERS: First Confirmed Case in the US and Exciting Treatment Potentials

By: Alexander Bernstein First reported in Saudi Arabia in 2012, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a coronavirus-caused respiratory illness that has claimed over a 100 lives in Saudia Arabia and has a deadly fatality rate of around 40%. Caused by a virus called MERS-CoV, this illness has since spread to 6 countries near the … Continue reading

Hydraulic Fracturing: “I’ll Wager $1, Trebek”
Erik Schiferle / Hydraulic Fracturing

Hydraulic Fracturing: “I’ll Wager $1, Trebek”

By Erik Schiferle Fracking, or hydraulic fracturing, is a natural gas collection process. The process requires the drilling of a well, which first descends vertically into shale rock layers between 6,000 and 10,000 feet underground and then continues horizontally for approximately one mile. Typically, a dilute acid mixed with thousands of gallons of water is pumped … Continue reading

A Short Primer on CRISPR Technology and the Age of Genetic Engineering
Aditya Nair / disease / DNA / gene / Infectious Diseases

A Short Primer on CRISPR Technology and the Age of Genetic Engineering

By: Aditya Nair A clever modification to a bacterial immune response could hold the key to curing hundreds of genetic diseases. We humans, from our selfish point of view, are accustomed to considering bacteria as agents of infection and the causes of great suffering. The all too common “strep throat” is the result of infection … Continue reading

Birth Rate and Infectious Disease: The Imperative of Childhood Vaccination
antibiotics / Biology / Causes for Concern / Ian MacArthur / infectious / Infectious Diseases / virus

Birth Rate and Infectious Disease: The Imperative of Childhood Vaccination

By: Ian MacArthur The problem of infectious disease has essentially been solved in First World countries. While the citizens of developed nations may suffer outbreaks of influenza from year to year, epidemics of measles, polio, tuberculosis, and other infectious diseases no longer pose a major threat to these populations thanks to the development of vaccines … Continue reading

Bad Romance: Slow Lorises and the Wildlife Trade
Alexandra DeCandia / Biology

Bad Romance: Slow Lorises and the Wildlife Trade

By Alexandra DeCandia On February 17th, “little monsters” were in uproar: a poisonous primate had the audacity to bite Lady Gaga. A fuzzy prop in her latest music video, the offending slow loris nipped the star’s finger and was immediately returned to its box and carried away “in disgrace,” its role stricken from the video. … Continue reading

Radical New Life-Saving Technique Borrowed From Science Fiction
Aditya Nair / Science Fiction

Radical New Life-Saving Technique Borrowed From Science Fiction

By Aditya Nair Modern medicine may be headed into the future. A revolutionary new technique is being tested at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Presbyterian Hospital to improve the outcomes of victims of massive blood loss by, almost ironically, bringing the patient as close to the brink of death as is safely possible. By … Continue reading